July 14, 2017

A lady walks out of the federal building on a nice sunny, workday afternoon, around 4:30 p.m. in downtown Salt Lake City and walks into an open air parking lot on 4th South and Main street. With lots of police and lots of people, one would think there would be nearly zero chance of a rape taking place in the middle of that parking lot, out in the open, but it did. The lady was middle aged and was carrying a concealed handgun. Nevertheless, the worst happened right between two cars on the hot asphalt and the rapist, a total stranger, got away.

A beautiful, talented, young scholarship dancer leaves her dance class on campus at UT Austin at about 9:00 pm and is walking to her dorm nearby.  Hundreds of people are inside buildings nearby, but none are aware that a stranger on a bicycle rode up to her, raped and killed her right there on campus. Surveillance cameras help catch the murderer.

I could go on and on talking about two young girls who were raped inside Cinemark movie complexes, one by a father who was there watching a movie with his wife and two kids, or the girl at the University of Utah who was walking to her car in a very busy parking lot in the middle of the day on Halloween and was confronted by a stranger in a mask and forced into a car and raped while there were many people nearby, but unaware of what was happening a few rows away in the parking lot.

The point is not to horrify and disgust you, but to point out the reality that it can happen to anyone, almost anywhere at any time. You do not have to be drunk at a party or have your drink spiked in order to be raped.

The reality is everyone is nice until someone is mean. The outcome of that moment will be determined by decisions made prior to that moment and I am not talking about the decision to be in that place at that time. Sure, we have control over where we are and what we do, but we have no control over where other people are and what they do, or attempt to do. 

What we do have some control over is whether we have been smart with regard to being prepared for an even that is highly likely to take place at some point.

What we don’t want to do is make ourselves miserable, uncomfortable and paranoid the other 99.9% of our lives or have our freedoms taken away in the name of safety.

So, with 73% of men and 89% of men likely to be victimized by violent crime, the best answer would be to find a way to be able to not only foil the bad person’s attempt to make us a victim, but to also improve our lives, day-to-day, gain more freedom, more confidence, more peace-of-mind.

Most everyone who is a victim of a violent crime lived for many years, going here and there freely, without being victimized. They walked, jogged or hiked by themselves. They went to their car in a dark parking lot. They walked across campus to their dorm after dark, many times and nothing bad happened, until it did.

The young girl standing at a public bus stop on a busy street in Rhode Island in the middle of the day would have never guessed a guy would risk grabbing her and forcing her into nearby bushes and raping her…but he did.

What’s also disturbing is that only about 8% of the rapes and 62% of assaults get reported by women. Men will report 82% of assaults.

ASSAULT STATISTIC INFOGRAPHIC:

Crime Statistics

The reality is that all of us have a very high probability of being assaulted at some point in our lives. If we are not, we would be the exception. 

So, what is the solution?  Take self-defense classes. Yes, that will help. Purchase a gun and learn how to use it. That might also help. However, there are millions of places where you cannot take a gun, millions of people who cannot carry a gun and the vast majority of situations that legally or morally do not justify lethal force, so I would suggest that a gun not be your only defense option.

Nothing any of us do is a guarantee, but it is simply intelligent to do what we can to minimize risk to ourselves and our family members.

Now, the next few paragraphs are going to sound a bit like a sales pitch and I guess they are, but I promise you that the information you will get is very valuable.

Imagine how it would be if every person 18 and older had a safe, easy, practical means of doing two things, 1) Stopping an attacker and 2) Instantly alerting not only the police, but every person within a one mile radius, that they are being attacked. These are people than might only be 50 feet away, but inside a building, a car or around the corner. Think about the impact that would these two things would have.

After over 15 years of manufacturing the top performing non-lethal defense devices, working with, training with and training top self-defense and defensive tactics experts in law enforcement and the military and seeing what actually happens on the street, we concluded that there are 5 key criteria that should be considered when developing a TigerLight for the masses, The D.A.D.® (Defense Alert Device).

  1. Is the device something you would carry in your hand so it is ready to use in a sudden, unexpected attack and is useful for things other than self-defense?
  2. Will it remain in hand during a sudden, physical assault and be easy to operate under extreme stress?
  3. Will it quickly incapacitate a much stronger, motivated or drug impaired attacker with non-lethal force for long enough to enable you to get to safety?
  4. Does is have the ability to contact those nearby who might be able to respond and help in seconds rather than minutes?
  5. Does it truly make your life better by giving you peace-of-mind and freedom, day-to-day?

The D.A.D.® 2 is specifically designed to address all five criteria and we maintain that it is the best in every single category. This is why experts say that nothing else even compares to the D.A.D.® 2 for non-lethal self-defense.  For more information on the D.A.D.® 2, go to the How It Works page at tigerlight.net.

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